Vote No on Proposition CC on Your November 5 Ballot

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TABOR was passed by tax-paying voters in 1992 and became part of the Colorado Constitution.  Its’ purpose is simple in that before lawmakers can raise your taxes, you get to vote yes or no, although spending increase by the inflation rate + population growth.  Any extra revenue collected beyond that should be refunded to taxpayers.  

If Proposition CC passes, you lose the right to vote on tax increases and lose any refunds due you.  Not just for a year or two but permanently.

TABOR keeps government honest and forces it to prioritize the budget and spending.

Don’t lose your rights and refunds!  

The TABOR Foundation & TABOR Committee urge you to Vote NO on Proposition CC

The TABOR Speakers Bureau is available to explain TABOR to your organization members and answer questions

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11903845_10153520059035902_2509540475343472795_nDoes your group or organization need a dynamic speaker and timely topic for your next meeting?

How about learning more on a subject that saves you money and stops the explosive growth of government spending?

You’ve heard of TABOR (The Taxpayers Bill Of Rights), haven’t you?

It’s been in the news quite a bit lately.

Why not use the TABOR Speakers Bureau for your next meeting?

We take the time to explain  “what” TABOR is along with what it does—or doesn’t do,  “how” it works, “why” it’s so important to Colorado,  “when” Coloradans get TABOR refunds, and “how” it impacts you. Continue reading

Raison d’être

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The Colorado Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) Foundation is a resource to educate and inform how TABOR protects Colorado taxpayers from runaway government spending.

Anything posted on this site is not an endorsement of any political cause, party, or group.

Oct 17

Dark money and big donors fuel the ballot battle over Proposition CC in Colorado

Dark money and big donors fuel the ballot battle over Proposition CC in Colorado

The 2019 election attracts millions in money from nonprofits, whose donors remain hidden despite a new state disclosure law

Oct 16

Four reasons to vote no on Proposition CC

Four reasons to vote no on Proposition CC

There are many reasons to vote no on Proposition CC, but for the sake of brevity, I will stick with the basics.

Reason No. 1: It does raise taxes.

While the first three words of the ballot language for Proposition CC are “Without raising taxes,” this simply isn’t true. And it’s hard to understand how proponents can keep a straight face with this one. If the state owes us money in the form of a refund because we’ve overpaid our taxes, and if they don’t give us the refund, we will in fact pay more taxes than we would have without Proposition CC. Period. Continue reading

Oct 15

Mike Rosen: NO on Proposition CC, YES on Proposition DD

Mike Rosen: NO on Proposition CC, YES on Proposition DD

Proposition CC – Retaining State Government revenue. VOTE NO.

A “yes” vote would allow the state to retain any surplus of revenues in excess of spending not only in fiscal year 2018-2019 but in all years to come. A “no” vote requires the state to refund budget surpluses to taxpayers as now required under current law.

In the Colorado Constitution, The Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) limits state government spending and taxation through a formula tied to population growth and inflation. Direct voter approval is required to change the limit. Article X, Section 20 (7) (d) reads: “If revenue from sources not excluded from fiscal year spending exceeds these limits in dollars for that fiscal year, the excess shall be refunded in the next fiscal year unless voters approve a revenue change as an offset.”

Through that last clause, Prop CC is asking voters to give up their prospective TABOR refunds permanently. It would spend those budget surpluses in equal shares on K-12 education, higher education and transportation without specifying how the money will be spent within those categories, leaving that to legislative whims now and in the future. Look at it this way: state government spending on K-12 in FY 2018-2019 exceeded $7 billion. Eliminating taxpayer refunds would direct an additional $103 million to K-12 education starting in FY 2020-2021. Seven billion is seven thousand million. One hundred million is a comparative drop in the bucket.

To read the rest of this story, please click (HERE):

Oct 14

Prop CC Debate: Should TABOR be De-Bruced?

Colorado Proposition CC

On November 5th, 2019 Coloradans will be voting on Proposition CC.
Read more about the ballot initiative HERE on the Secretary of State’s website.

  • Amie Baca-Oehlert, President of the Colorado Education Association – Proponent
  • George Brauchler, Colorado’s 18th District Attorney – Opponent
  • Michael Fields, Executive Director of Colorado Rising Action – Opponent
  • Scott Wasserman, President of the Bell Policy Center – Proponent

 

Oct 13

Colorado Proposition CC: May state keep all taxes rather than refund excess as required by TABOR

Colorado Proposition CC: May state keep all taxes rather than refund excess as required by TABOR

PUBLISHED: 

What it asks: “Without raising taxes and to better fund public schools, higher education, and roads, bridges, and transit, within a balanced budget, may the state keep and spend all the revenue it annually collects after June 30, 2019, but is not currently allowed to keep and spend under Colorado law, with an annual independent audit to show how the retained revenues are spent?”

What it means: Proposition CC would allow the state to retain revenue it refunds under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights for education and transportation purposes. The measure would require the state auditor to hire a private entity to conduct an annual financial audit regarding use of funds as provided under the measure.

It will allow state government to keep the money it collects from existing sources annually instead of refunding some to taxpayers when annual revenue growth, which is tied to inflation and the percentage change in state population, exceeds that. Any money collected above this limit is refunded to taxpayers unless the voters allow the state to spend it.

Proposition CC would eliminate that cap allowing the state to keep and spend all future excess revenue on transportation, K-12 schools and higher education rather than refunding it to taxpayers.

To read the rest of this story, please click (HERE):

Oct 13

Conservative think tank opposes tax refund, sports betting ballot measures

Conservative think tank opposes tax refund, sports betting ballot measures

FILE - Denver Vote
A voter casts her ballot at the Denver Elections Division Tuesday, May 7, 2019, in Denver.

The think tank, part of Colorado Christian University, says it’s opposing Propositions CC and DD because they aren’t fiscally responsible and don’t help families in the state. The state constitution’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) requires voter approval for all tax increases.

“Colorado is more free, families are stronger, and our state budget is healthier if both Proposition CC and Proposition DD are rejected,” Centennial Institute Director Jeff Hunt said.

When state government collects revenue above its spending cap, TABOR requires that money to be refunded back to taxpayers. Proposition CC asks voters to allow state government to permanently keep the occasional tax refunds.

To read the rest of this story, please click (HERE):